Fort Hamilton High School

Skip to main content
Information for Students » School-Wide Writing Policy

School-Wide Writing Policy

SCHOOL-WIDE WRITING POLICY

At Fort Hamilton High School our goal is to develop life long competent, confident writers who can make and support claims, and express thoughts, emotions and opinions using language to discover, narrate, describe, explain,

argue and persuade.

Objectives in all disciplines:

Students will be able to:

  1. Apply acquired vocabulary in context across content areas.
  2. Choose to write independently and creatively, expressing ideas in a logical and coherent manner.
  3. Implement writing as a process, which includes pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, proof-reading and publishing.
  4. See the connection between their reading and their writing in all content areas.
  5. Transfer major concepts from reading to writing, incorporating facts, details and ideas.
  6. Use the Library Media Center and the Internet to further enhance research and writing skills.
  7. Use strategies and skills to create meaning.
  8. Write in response to a variety of tasks and for different purposes.
  9. Write “SMART” goals across content areas.

Expectations in all disciplines

  • Students will have access to exemplars and rubrics that clearly set expectations for writing and assessment.
  • Students will plan and set individual “SMART” goals for each content area.
  • Teachers will assess student writing and hold students accountable for writing assignments.
  • Teachers will expect students to write at home in response to homework assignments.
  • Teachers will identify and teach the writing skills required in each discipline and for Regents/RCT exams and other assessments. These writing skills should be taught as part of the curriculum during the school term and reflected in homework assignments, and classroom and final exams. 
  • Teachers will model the writing process in all content classes.
  • Teachers will provide daily opportunities for students to respond in writing. The written assignment must be challenging and complex, so that students can develop and support their thoughts. Suggested activities include responding to the ‘Do Now,’ in journals, critical thinking questions in the workshop part of the lesson, or summarizing the main ideas of the lesson.
  • Teachers will provide opportunities for the teaching of grammar, usage, spelling, and the expansion of vocabulary in context.
  • Teachers will use and monitor a variety of writing strategies appropriate for writing tasks in content classes.
  • Teachers will use writing as a way for students to discover their ideas. Different ways for students to use writing as a way of discovering ideas include: brainstorming, lists, clustering, free writing, reading journals, double entry notebooks, etc.

 

Evaluations:

  • Critical lens, expository, narrative, argumentative and persuasive essays
  • I-Search and Research Reports
  • Notebooks, journals and literature logs
  • Questions for extended response
  • Regents writing tasks
  • SAT I and II (Essay)

 

Evaluation questions:

  1. Are students aware of what is considered an exemplary written response to a task?
  2. Are students aware of the rubric that will be used to assess their writing?
  3. Are students aware of their specific goals and how to achieve them?
  4. Can students analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources as well as charts, graphs, tables, cartoons, and non-fiction articles and integrate this information into their writing?
  5. Can students analyze and interpret the writing task as to audience and purpose?
  6. Can students choose to write independently and creatively, expressing ideas in a logical and coherent manner?
  7. Can students implement writing as a process, which includes pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, proofreading and publishing?
  8. Can students incorporate expanded vocabulary into written assignments?
  9. Can students see the connection between their reading and their writing in all content areas?
  10. Can students take notes of different kinds of oral, visual and printed material and incorporate important information into their writing?
  11. Can students transfer major concepts from reading to writing, incorporating facts, details and ideas?
  12. Can students use the Library Media Center and the Internet to further enhance research and writing skills?
  13. Can students use strategies and skills to create meaning?
  14. Can students write in response to a variety of tasks and for different purposes?

Writing in Content Classes: Please note that additional or replacement writing assignments may be incorporated to ensure alignment with the Common Core Learning Standards as more information about the CCLS assessments becomes available.
See Academics Departments for more information